Tortious Interference

Tortious Interference with Contract

The elements of an action for tortious interference with an existing contract are: (1) the plaintiff had a valid contract, (2) the defendant willfully and intentionally interfered with the contract, (3) the interference proximately caused the plaintiff’s injury, and (4) the plaintiff incurred actual damages or loss. Butnaru v. Ford Motor Co., 84 S.W.3d 198, 207 (Tex. 2002).


Tortious Interference with Prospective Relations

The elements of an action for tortious interference with prospective business relations are: (1) there was a reasonable probability that the plaintiff would have entered into a business relationship with a third person, (2) the defendant intentionally interfered with the relationship, (3) the defendant’s conduct was independently tortious or unlawful, (4) the interference proximately caused the plaintiff’s injury, and (5) the plaintiff suffered actual damage or loss. Coinmach Corp. v. Aspenwood Apt. Corp., 417 S.W.3d 909, 923 (Tex. 2013).


If you believe you have a claim for tortious interference with an existing contract or with prospective business relations, or you have been wrongly sued for either or both of these actions, please contact Mr. Browning for a free phone consultation.